Feed My Ride
In association with Progress Packaging

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Wouter Weylandt:
For each musette purchased a donation will be made to Wouter’s family, following the tragic death of the Leopard Trek cyclist in the 2011 Giro d’Italia.
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Feed My Ride is a collection of limited edition cycling musettes designed by 15 leading UK designers, curated and produced by Progress Packaging.

All musettes are screen printed dark grey on 12 oz custom dyed canvas with woven PP handle and two colour moulded silicone label. Designs produced in a limited edition of 100.

Accept & Proceed

Two designs (front / reverse)

‘Four legs good, two legs bad’ was the mantra of the animals in George Orwell’s allegorical novel, Animal Farm. We’ve given 2011s cycling revolution a familiar refrain.

Musette photo (detail)

Bibliothéque

Two designs (front / reverse)

It’s a bag innit… and you put stuff innit… Innit?

Musette photo (detail)

Design Project

Two designs (front / reverse)

The bicycle is an accessible mode of transport, allowing cyclists to go from one place to another – for any means. The phrase ‘a to b’ plays on this rationale with an added visual twist.

Musette photo (detail)

I Love Dust

Two designs (front / reverse)

At I Love Dust we are very proud of our cycling heritage. Our musette bag design ‘Take the high road’, uses a clever play on words – relevant to both the environment and cycling itself. In relation to the environmental aspect, the words represent taking the moral high ground – keeping the environment greener by choosing to cycle opposed to driving. The cycling association is more literal – simply meaning get on your bike and hit the road!

Musette photo (detail)

Leinz

Two designs (front / reverse)

Whilst I may appear quite serene on the outside as I wheel around town dodging in and out of traffic, in my mind there are hundreds of thoughts all going on at once. This bag is meant to represent a very small part of mine and other cyclists internal monologue that occurs in a single cycle trip around the mean streets of London.

Musette photo (detail)

MadeThought

Two designs (front / reverse)

Beautiful vistas as seen by the cyclist… rushing downhill past them.

Musette photo (detail)

Marque

Two designs (front / reverse)

The polka dot pattern we have chosen is based on the distinctive jersey the leader of the mountain stage of the Tour de France wears. The jersey that signifies ‘King of the Mountains’ was first recognised during the 1933 event and then fully introduced in 1975.

The dots on the jersey are red in reality but because the colour palette for this project was prescribed we decided to let our design act simply as a representation of the idea.

Musette photo (detail)

Mind Design

Two designs (front / reverse)

Our design refers to the early days of cycling around the turn of the century when gentleman (dressed in classic tweed) were sporting often impressive moustaches. Inspired by this era, moustaches in all shapes and sizes are coming back into fashion with today’s cyclist. At the same time we looked at the huge variety of different shaped handle bars, one particular type is even called the ‘moustache bar’.

Musette photo (detail)

Moving Brands

Two designs (front / reverse)

We believed the key challenge was to create a bag that would be conspicuous on the road, in what is often a chaotic environment. The design references the simple geometric shapes and linearity seen in the graphic language of the road, while the alternating broken lines disrupt the eye and aid stand-out.

Musette photo (detail)

Multistorey

Two designs (front / reverse)

It’s a little known fact that Eddy Merckx has a younger brother called Frederijk – Freddie for short – also an ex-professional cyclist. Freddie’s somewhat lacklustre career as a domestique in the mid 70s was brought sharply to an end by health problems (‘Pot Belge’ was rumoured to be to blame). In the 80s he could be found touring the bars and working men’s clubs of Flanders as the singer of a tribute band called Kween. His whereabouts today are unknown.

Musette photo (detail)

North

Two designs (front / reverse)

The front of the bag shows a fresco of Madonna del Ghisallo, who was made patroness of cyclists by Pope Pius XII. A chapel named after her is situated on the Colle del Ghisallo (754m), which is traditionally on the route of Giro di Lombardia, and is a well-known pilgrimage site for cyclists.

The reverse is a pun on the term ‘recycling’ and a respectful nod to berlin-based designer Mr. Rasmus Giesel.

Musette photo (detail)

OPX

Two designs (front / reverse)

When you are making a short trip on your bike, musette is perfect; phone, wallet, lock and go. When you are out for longer, you use a larger bag; a jacket, bike tools, and maybe some more. You might go to the flower market and buy a lovely bunch, then pannier is desirable. But how about going for a picnic? The list goes on; food, drink, blanket, badminton rackets, and newspaper... Wouldn’t it be lovely if you can carry everything with you on your bike?

Musette photo (detail)

Rapha

Two designs (front / reverse)

Record Recipe – June ’65.
The Rapha musette celebrates Dick Poole’s superlative End to End journey – the first man to cycle Land’s End to John O’Groats inside two days. Using Dick’s nourishment as a central theme of the design, the musette acts as a recipe to success, listing his food intake whilst pedalling his Mercian. Accentuating the musette is a strong diagonal split front and back, visualising the epic 1,407km journey along the spine of Great Britain.

Musette photo (detail)

SEA

Two designs (front / reverse)

Work/Home is inspired by a piece of graffiti which I (Bryan Edmondson) pass on my commute everyday to and from Liverpool Street station. We wanted to repurpose this as a piece of signage design. Akzidenz Grotesk was the natural choice of typeface, its legibility in signage has made it synonymous with transport applications. The heavily proportioned arrow symbol is derived from the same visual language.

Musette photo (detail)

Spin

Two designs (front / reverse)

Head badges seem a bit forgotten on bikes these days – it’s all stickers, swooshes and vinyl stripes. But there’s something heraldic, slightly tweedy and secretly ostentatious about a proper metal nameplate. As unique and varied as each bike’s owner, they’re an elegant touch from a more civilised age.

Musette photo (detail)

Promo musette

Two designs (front / reverse)

Promotional musette for the exhibition at Look Mum No Hands! – screen printed in two colours (dark grey and yellow).

Musette photo (detail)

Sam Dunn (Student musette)

Two designs (front / reverse)

Progress Packaging set a brief to the students on the Communication Design course at the University of Huddersfield, and selected Sam as the winner from all the entrants.

The idea for the bag was to truly show the beauty of the bicycle. I wanted the artwork to merge with everyday life. I was inspired with the idea of community and the functions of a bicycle. The bag becomes a reflection of the people and the journeys they take both bicycle related and unrelated.

Musette photo (detail)

© Musette designs reproduced by kind permission of the individual designers.